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The Power of a Pinky Toe - I Do Every Day - June 9, 2020

  • 2020 Jun 09

The Power of a Pinky Toe
By Ben McGuire

I crumbled into a heap on my bedroom floor, trying desperately not to say all the words in my brain. We have children in the house.

I had just smashed my pinky toe on the side of my dresser. An explosion of pain rippled through my whole body.

I have the unfortunate tendency of smashing or stubbing my toes. While the pain is surprisingly intense, the lingering effects are equally debilitating.

When damaged, this small, often-overlooked part of my body impacts everything—my ability to walk, the way I walk, what I can physically do.

I rarely think about how each toe functions. Their job goes unnoticed until one isn’t performing properly.

Sadly, the same can be true in my marriage.

Jill works tirelessly to make our home a place of safety—a place we all want to be, a refuge from a harsh and cruel world.

Often, her labor of love goes unnoticed, underappreciated by our kids and me until the weight she bears bends her to the point of breaking.

When she is wounded and weary, our whole family feels it.

As her husband, I need to be more vigilant, more aware of the loads she carries. But not only for the purpose of sparing the whole family from the consequences.

Calling attention to the hidden ways she serves communicates value to her tasks and honors her as a wife and mother.

I usually wound my toes because I’m not paying attention to what I’m doing or because I’m being hasty to the detriment of my whole body. By taking greater care, I show honor to my less acknowledged body parts.

How much more does my wife need that type of care and attention!

Need more helpful tips? Read “10 Ideas: Helping Your Marriage Last a Lifetime.”

The Good Stuff: The eye cannot say to the hand, “I have no need of you,” nor again the head to the feet, “I have no need of you.” On the contrary, the parts of the body that seem to be weaker are indispensable… But God has so composed the body, giving greater honor to the part that lacked it, that there may be no division in the body, but that the members may have the same care for one another. If one member suffers, all suffer together; if one member is honored, all rejoice together. (1 Corinthians 12:21-26)

Action Points: What are you doing to value and honor the ways your spouse serves you and/or your family? What can you do to help him or her carry the load she bears? Write a note of thanks and leave it someplace obvious. Intentionally praise your spouse in front of others, especially your children.

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