August 19

1 Kings 19; Romans 12

Thought from Today's Old Testament Passage:

"But he himself went a day's journey into the wilderness, and came and sat down under a juniper tree: and he requested for himself that he might die; and said, It is enough; now, O LORD, take away my life; for I am not better than my fathers."—1 Kings xix. 4

Elijah failed in the very point at which he was strongest, and that is where most men fail. In Scripture, it is the wisest man who proves himself to be the greatest fool; just as the meekest man, Moses, spoke hasty and bitter words. Abraham failed in his faith, and Job in his patience; so, he who was the most courageous of all men, fled from an angry woman. He could stand face to face with that woman's husband, and say to him, in answer to his false accusation, "I have not troubled Israel; but thou, and thy father's house, in that ye have forsaken the commandments of the Lord, and thou has followed Baalim;" yet he was afraid of Jezebel, and he fled from her, and suffered such faintness of heart that he even "requested for himself that he might die." This was, I suppose, to show us that Elijah was not strong by nature, but only in the strength imparted to him by God; so that, when the divine strength was gone, he was of no more account than anybody else. When grace is for a time withdrawn, the natural Elijah is a weak as any other natural man; it is only when supernatural power is working through him that he rises out of himself, and so the grace of God is glorified in him. 

It is some comfort to us when we see that we are not the only persons who have failed through the infirmity of the flesh.

Charles H. Spurgeon, The Treasury of the Bible, Vol. I (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Publishing House) 1962, pp. 795-796. 

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