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<< Daily New Life with Steve Arterburn

New Life daily devotion - February 2

  • 2013 Feb 02
  • COMMENTS

 

The Fragile Male Ego

Our fragile male egos can easily present a barrier to oneness and intimacy with our wives. One woman made this candid comment that makes my point: “Most things in our marriage are his plans and desires.[He never shows me any of his deep feelings, and I can’t say that I’ve ever felt one with him. He once said, ‘If I let you in and show you my feelings, I’d be vulnerable to becoming hurt.’”

A husband’s refusal to be emotionally vulnerable is a sure sign that his fragile male ego is presenting an obstacle to marital health.

Another sure sign that the fragile male ego is at work is when a woman’s gifts and talents are perceived by her husband as a threat to his competency. This is an issue I’ve seen come up time and again in marital counseling.

My point, men, is that an overly sensitive male ego undercuts our ability to be vulnerable and humble—two necessary characteristics for strong and growing marriages.

One of the church’s great theologians was fond of referring to marriage as “the school of character.” That’s because marriage, by its very design, will teach us things like vulnerability and humility—that is, if we’ll only commit ourselves to becoming attentive and teachable students.

The lessons we need to learn aren’t always easy. Yet they’re profoundly rewarding.
 

 

To purchase this devotional please visit New Life Ministries

Taken from The Life Recovery Devotional: Thirty Meditations from Scripture for Each Step in Recovery by Stephen Arterburn and David Stoop. Copyright © 1991 by Stephen Arterburn and David Stoop. Used by permission of Tyndale House Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved.

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