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Amanda Casanova


Amanda Casanova is a writer living in Dallas, Texas. She has covered news for ChristianHeadlines.com since 2014. She has also contributed to The Houston Chronicle, U.S. News and World Report and IBelieve.com. She blogs at The Migraine Runner.

About 80 percent of Black churchgoers say they feel their church is comforting because it is a place where they have control over their lives, according to a report from Barna Group.

The Barna Group report, released this week, was developed in partnership with Black Millennial Cafe Urban Ministries, Inc., American Bible Society, Compassion InternationalGloo, and Lead.NYC.

The report is part of Barna Group’s State of the Black Church project, a study which looks at topics such as spiritual identity and expression, gentrification, the legacy of historically Black churches and the impact of COVID-19 on churches. A final “Trends in the Black Church” report is scheduled to be released this summer.

"I believe in vigilance in every area of potential injury to Black communities,” said Rev. Dr. Brianna Parker, CEO of Black Millennial Cafe. “Twenty-plus years without extensive data in Black faith communities left a deficit in resources and prohibited opportunities. As a lead researcher of this study, I am proud of the work this project will do for Black churches and communities in an age when racial disparities are being highlighted and exposed as an opportunity for change.

The study also found that 73 percent of Black adults and 75 percent of Black churchgoers say they feel “powerless” when it comes to politics. That same number for Black adults was 61 percent in 1996.

“This study underscores this historic moment, in the midst of a devastating pandemic and the aftermath of one of our nation's most contentious transitions of power, when America must now undertake a second Reconstruction,” said C. Jeffrey Wright, President and CEO of Urban Ministries, Inc.

Also found in the study:

  • 67 percent of Black adults in the study considered themselves Democrat. Six percent said Republican, and 19 percent said Independent. Eight percent declared no affiliation.
  • Of Black churchgoers, 76 percent said they were Democrat, and 5 percent said Republican. About 14 percent declared Independent and 5 percent were no affiliation.

“The story of the Black Church in America is important for our nation and for Christianity,” said Brooke Hempell, Senior Vice President of Research at Barna. “We have conducted hundreds of studies about faith and culture, and we have found consistently that Black Americans have a more active faith ­– in prayer, reading Scripture, and worship – than other racial groups in this country. We are excited to share the story of this legacy with fresh data.”

Photo courtesy: J Waye Covington/Unsplash


Amanda Casanova is a writer living in Dallas, Texas. She has covered news for ChristianHeadlines.com since 2014. She has also contributed to The Houston Chronicle, U.S. News and World Report and IBelieve.com. She blogs at The Migraine Runner.

Joe Scheidler, founder of the Pro-Life Action League and a longtime supporter of the pro-life movement, died Monday. He was 93.

According to the Associated Press, Scheidler died of pneumonia.

Many called him the “godfather of pro-life activism.”

Scheidler and his wife, Ann, founded the Pro-Life Action League in 1980, and he was widely known as the man downtown who held up signs against abortion with pictures of fetuses.

Scheidler also wrote a book on abortion and produced videos about the issue.

His oldest son, Eric Scheidler, told the Chicago Sun-Times that his father “devoted five decades of his long life to proclaiming the value of human life at its most vulnerable stage, the child in the womb.”

Former U.S. Rep. Dan Lipinski released a statement this week, expressing his condolences and thanking Scheidler for “drawing attention to laws that put unborn children outside the protection of our Constitution.”

“His efforts to educate the general public and to protest the killing of unborn children earned the admiration of millions of Americans across the country,” Lipinski wrote.

Scheidler was born in Indiana in 1927. He served in the U.S. Navy as a military policeman during World War II. He also studied to become a priest, but later decided to move to Chicago where he married and started a family.

In 1986, the National Organization for Women named Scheidler in a lawsuit, alleging there had been violence as pro-life supporters protested at abortion clinics. Finally, after 20 years in courts, the U.S. Supreme Court sided with Scheidler. The Pro-Life Action League called the win a “decisive victory.”

Mary FioRito, an attorney and fellow at the Ethics & Public Policy Center in Washington, D.C., said Scheidler had likely been named in the lawsuit because of his reputation and for “a certain degree of effectiveness in turning women away from abortion clinics.”

He is survived by his wife, seven children, 26 grandchildren and one great granddaughter.

Photo courtesy: ©Eric Scheidler Facebook


Amanda Casanova is a writer living in Dallas, Texas. She has covered news for ChristianHeadlines.com since 2014. She has also contributed to The Houston Chronicle, U.S. News and World Report and IBelieve.com. She blogs at The Migraine Runner.

Sen. Lindsey Graham is asking Sen. Chuck Schumer to put forward a Senate vote that would dismiss the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump.

According to Business Insider, Graham sent a letter to Schumer Sunday asking for the vote in the name of “healing” in the nation.

"The Senate should vote to dismiss the article of impeachment once it is received in the Senate," Graham, a Republican from South Carolina, said in the letter. "We will be delaying indefinitely, if not forever, the healing of this great nation if we do otherwise."

The House of Representatives impeached Trump last week on a charge of “incitement of insurrection” after rioters attacked the U.S. Capitol on January 6. Five people died from the riots. Many have accused Trump of encouraging his supporters to riot.

A trial in the Senate over the charge is set for after Inauguration Day.

Schumer said in his letter that it would be “unconstitutional” to hold an impeachment trial after he is out of office, but legal experts have also said a trial would be allowed.

In a column for the National Review, Andrew C. McCarthy, senior fellow at the National Review Institute, said impeachment is “meant to be very difficult.”

“The simple-majority-vote trigger in the House means that any grave presidential misconduct can readily be alleged as an impeachable act; but the mandatory two-thirds-vote in the Senate ensures that impeachment-and-removal will not take place unless the misconduct is so grave that a consensus of the nation, cutting across partisan and ideological lines, is established that the president must be expelled,” he said.

McCarthy said the ideal resolution would be a “bicameral, bipartisan resolution of censure” that condemns Trump.

“Trump would remain the only president ever impeached twice, and the censure would stand as an emphatic verdict of history,” McCarthy said.

Photo courtesy: ©Getty Images/Tom Brenner/Stringer


Amanda Casanova is a writer living in Dallas, Texas. She has covered news for ChristianHeadlines.com since 2014. She has also contributed to The Houston Chronicle, U.S. News and World Report and IBelieve.com. She blogs at The Migraine Runner.

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