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Religion Today Blog Christian Blog and Commentary

Kayla Koslosky


Kayla Koslosky has been the Editor of ChristianHeadlines.com since 2018. She has B.A. degrees in English and History and previously wrote for and was the managing editor of the Yellow Jacket newspaper. She has written on her blog since 2012 and has also contributed to IBelieve.com and Crosswalk.com.

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died Friday night in her Washington D.C. home. She was 87 years old.

According to an announcement from the Supreme Court, Ginsburg’s death was caused by complications from her metastatic pancreatic cancer.

“Our Nation has lost a jurist of historic stature,” Chief Justice John Roberts said regarding Ginsburg’s passing. “We at the Supreme Court have lost a cherished colleague. Today we mourn, but with confidence that future generations will remember Ruth Bader Ginsburg as we knew her – a tireless and resolute champion of justice.”

According to the Associated Press, in July, Ginsburg announced that she was undergoing chemotherapy treatment for lesions on her liver. This was her fifth battle with cancer since 1999.

Ginsburg was born in 1933 in Brooklyn, New York. She graduated from Cornell University in 1954. That same year, she married her husband, Martin. In 1959, Ginsburg graduated at the top of her class from Columbia University law school. She went on to serve as a law clerk to the Honorable Edmund L. Palmieri before becoming a research associate and then associate director of the Columbia Law School Project on International Procedure from 1961–1963. Ginsburg then served as a professor of law at Rutgers University School of Law from 1963–1972, and Columbia Law School from 1972–1980. In 1980, she was appointed as Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit.

Then, in 1993, President Bill Clinton appointed Ginsburg to the Supreme Court. Ginsburg became an icon among many liberal feminists. In 1996, she wrote the majority opinion ordering the Virginia Military Institute to allow women into the school. Ginsburg was also a vocal pro-abortion advocate, fought for voting rights and was an advocate for equal pay for women.

Ginsburg’s husband, Martin, died in 2010. She is survived by her two children, Jane and James, and several grandchildren.

Photo courtesy: ©Public Domain/U.S. Government


Kayla Koslosky has been the Editor of ChristianHeadlines.com since 2018. She has B.A. degrees in English and History and previously wrote for and was the managing editor of the Yellow Jacket newspaper. She has written on her blog since 2012 and has also contributed to IBelieve.com and Crosswalk.com.

The organization, Evangelicals for Social Action, is changing the group’s name to Christians for Social Action, the organization announced this week.

According to The Christian Post, in a statement, the Christian scholar-activist group says the word “evangelical” has become a polarizing term.

“Today the word ‘evangelical’ in the popular mind has largely political connotations,” Ron Sider, the organization’s founder and president emeritus, said in a statement.

“For significant numbers of people, it signifies a right-wing political movement irrevocably committed to Donald Trump. Many young people raised in evangelical churches are turning away in disgust–abandoning evangelical churches and even sometimes the Christian faith itself. And the larger society thinks of evangelicals not as people committed to Jesus Christ and the biblical gospel but as pro-Trump political activists.”

Sider said he hopes the change will help the group welcome more people.

“We believe it will help us win a listening ear with more people. And it certainly will avoid people refusing to even take a minute to see who we are because they see a word that for many people immediately signals political folks,” he said.

The change comes as popular evangelical Christians have become more vocal on a select number of issues, Sider says.

“They identified more and more with the politically conservative part of the Republican Party,” he said.

Finally, the name change will better reflect what the organization stands for, Sider said.

“The result is that ESA increasingly found that our name failed to communicate who we really are. And it also led people to click off any message with that name before we had any opportunity to explain that (the word comes from the Greek word, evangel, for gospel.) Because of a shameful history of white evangelical racism, the black church has long refused to use the term evangelical for itself even though its theology and piety are very close to what the word evangelical used to mean,” he said.

Photo courtesy: Christians for Social Action Facebook


Amanda Casanova is a writer living in Dallas, Texas. She has covered news for ChristianHeadlines.com since 2014. She has also contributed to The Houston Chronicle, U.S. News and World Report and IBelieve.com. She blogs at The Migraine Runner.

The U.S. Department of Defense says new guidelines will be put into place to protect religious liberty rights for military service members.

According to CBN News, the U.S. Secretary of Defense Mark Esper began looking into the issue after hearing that some military members and chaplains were banned from attending worship services off base during the coronavirus pandemic.

The new guidelines, called Instruction 1300.17, say that the DOD must:

  • Acknowledge that service members have the right to observe the principles of their religion.
  • Accommodate religious practices and procedures for service members.
  • Ensure that religious beliefs shall not serve as a foundation for discrimination, loss of promotion, education, training, or assignment.
  • Require that military departments implement training and oversee the performance of these policies and procedures regarding the religious practices of service members, commanders, chaplains, and recruiters.

The policy also states military leadership must accommodate “individual expressions of sincerely held beliefs,” adding that “a Service member’s expression of such beliefs may not, in so far as practicable, be used as the basis of any adverse personnel action, discrimination, or denial of promotion, schooling, training, or assignment.”

First Liberty Institute first submitted a letter to Esper in May, asking for “clear DOD guidance, consistent with Congress’ directive, that strongly protects religious freedom within the DOD.”

"This new guidance is a great victory for America's brave service members, for whom faith is an essential element of their life and duty," said Mike Berry, general counsel for First Liberty Institute.

"Since the days of the Revolutionary War, religious freedom has been a force multiplier for our military. We applaud our Commander in Chief, President Trump, and Secretary Esper for ensuring that religious liberty is alive and well in our Armed Forces."

He added, however, that “there’s still a lot of work to be done.”

“I think there are going to continue to be issues regarding religious liberty but … this new regulation should go a long way to at least providing clarity and … strong protections for religious freedom in the military,” he said.

Photo courtesy: ©Getty Images/MivPiv


Amanda Casanova is a writer living in Dallas, Texas. She has covered news for ChristianHeadlines.com since 2014. She has also contributed to The Houston Chronicle, U.S. News and World Report and IBelieve.com. She blogs at The Migraine Runner.

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