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Kayla Koslosky


Kayla Koslosky has been the Editor of ChristianHeadlines.com since 2018. She has B.A. degrees in English and History and previously wrote for and was the managing editor of the Yellow Jacket newspaper. She has written on her blog since 2012 and has also contributed to IBelieve.com and Crosswalk.com.

Eight students, ranging from incoming freshmen to graduate students, filed a federal lawsuit against Indiana University on Monday over the public college's requirement that all students, staff and faculty be vaccinated against COVID-19 before returning to campus in the fall.

According to the lawsuit, the students are claiming that the requirement "violates the liberty protected by the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which includes rights of personal autonomy and bodily integrity, and the right to reject medical treatment."

The lawsuit also argues that IU's mandate further violates Indiana's new vaccine passport law, which prohibits "state and local units" from requiring citizens to present proof of vaccination through a "passport" system.

According to the IndyStar, IU's vaccine mandate has been the center of controversy in the state since it was introduced last month. Some state officials have reportedly asked the school to rescind the policy, while others have asked the state's governor, Eric Holcomb, to block it. The state's Attorney General, Todd Rokita, also weighed in on the policy, arguing in a public opinion that it violated state law.

After legislators passed the vaccine passport law, the university kept but amended its policy to say that students and staff are not required to provide documentation proving that they have been vaccinated, but instead must verify that they have been vaccinated on an online form.

"The requirement for all Indiana University students, faculty and staff to be fully vaccinated before the return to school in August remains in place," a university spokesperson said on Monday. "As part of IU's response to the ongoing pandemic, the vaccine mandate is helping to support a return to safe and more normal operations this fall," the spokesperson continued.

James Bopp Jr., the attorney representing the students in the case, argued in a press release that "IU's Mandate does not take into account that virtually everyone on IU's campus, whether professors, staff, or students, can take the vaccine to protect themselves, and wear masks and social distance, if they want to."

He continued, "Thus, IU allows for one and only one option for IU students who do not qualify for its limited exemptions —take the vaccine or be virtually expelled from IU. This kind of total disregard for student freedom to choose for themselves, for student's bodily autonomy, and for the need for voluntary and informed consent cannot stand under the U.S. Constitution."

According to the IndyStar, several of the students involved in the lawsuit have applied and been granted exemptions from the vaccine based on their religious beliefs.

Photo courtesy: ©GettyImages/Ridofranz


Kayla Koslosky has been the Editor of ChristianHeadlines.com since 2018. She has B.A. degrees in English and History and previously wrote for and was the managing editor of the Yellow Jacket newspaper. She has written on her blog since 2012 and has also contributed to IBelieve.com and Crosswalk.com.

Christians joined other religious minority groups in Bangladesh recently as part of the annual "Black Day" protest against the 1988 constitutional amendments that establish Islam as the official state religion.

Religious minority groups say the establishment of the amendments has led to persecution against non-Muslims in the country. The march was held on June 9.

"With the amendment, the seed of sectarian politics has been planted," said Nirmol Rozario, a Christian leader who was part of the march. "In a country where Hindus, Buddhists and Christians also live, a single religion cannot proclaim itself as the state religion. We do not agree."

According to The Christian Post, there are about 1.6 million Christians in Bangladesh, which amounts to about 1 percent of the country’s population.

"In its Constitution, Bangladesh declares itself a secular country. But at the same time, it says that the state religion is Islam," Rozario said. "This is a clear contradiction. And if this state of affairs continues, Islamic fundamentalism and religious hatred will end up creating serious problems."

Christian Freedom International says police often allow violence and discrimination against non-Muslims, and many religious minorities worship in secret to avoid "retaliation."

"Churches, especially house churches where Muslim-background believers meet, prefer not to display any Christian symbols in order to avoid being recognized," a report from the Christian persecution watchdog ministry Open Doors U.K. previously stated. "Sometimes, even historic or mainline churches face opposition and restrictions in putting up a cross or other religious symbols."

The secretary-general of the Bangladesh Hindu Buddhist Christian Unity Council, Rana Dasgupta, has asked that the country create a minority ministry and a commission for religious communities.

In early 2020, Muslim men attacked a Christian community in Bangladesh. The area was home to thousands of refugees who fled Myanmar. At least 22 Rohingya Christian families were attacked, and a Christian pastor and his 14-year-old daughter were abducted.

Photo courtesy: ©Getty Images/Natanael Ginting


Amanda Casanova is a writer living in Dallas, Texas. She has covered news for ChristianHeadlines.com since 2014. She has also contributed to The Houston Chronicle, U.S. News and World Report and IBelieve.com. She blogs at The Migraine Runner.

China's Foreign Ministry says the Wuhan Virology Lab should receive the Nobel Prize in Medicine for its role in studying COVID-19.

The virus was first recorded in the city of Wuhan in late 2019.

Last week, China's Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhau Lijian dismissed claims that the lab itself was responsible for the pandemic, the Jerusalem Post reports.

"If those that first publish high-quality viral genomes were to be accused of making the virus, then Prof. Luc Montagnier, who first discovered the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), would be considered the culprit of AIDS rather than awarded the Nobel Prize, and Mr. Louis Pasteur, who discovered microbes, would be held accountable for the disease-causing bacteria all around the globe," Lijian said.

"By analogy, the team in Wuhan should be awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine for their research on COVID-19, instead of being criticized."

The Wuhan lab is already a candidate for the 2021 Outstanding Science and Technology Achievement Prize of the Chinese Academy of Sciences for its role in helping trace the pathogeny of the virus.

Some, however, believe the virus may have been leaked by the Wuhan lab.

Shi Zhengli, the virologist at the Wuhan lab, has rejected the claims.

Nonetheless, U.S. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy is asking his fellow Republicans in Congress to hold China accountable for failing to keep the virus from becoming a pandemic, The Christian Post reports.

In a letter titled Holding China Accountable: A Republican Call to Action & Roadmap for Covid-19 Accountability, McCarthy claims that Democrats in Congress will not hold the Chinese government accountable for the pandemic.

"The unfortunate reality is that countless friends and family members could have been saved had it not been for the deception of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP)," wrote McCarthy.

The letter cites a University of Southampton study that found that COVID-19 infections could have been reduced by between 66 and 95 percent if interventions had been made one to three weeks earlier.

Photo courtesy: ©Getty Images/Panorama Images


Amanda Casanova is a writer living in Dallas, Texas. She has covered news for ChristianHeadlines.com since 2014. She has also contributed to The Houston Chronicle, U.S. News and World Report and IBelieve.com. She blogs at The Migraine Runner.

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