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Regis Nicoll Christian Blog and Commentary

Back to the drawing board for Evolutionists

  • Regis Nicoll
    Regis Nicoll is a Centurion of The Chuck Colson Center for Christian Worldview. He spent 30 years as a nuclear specialist, and is now a freelance writer who writes on current issues from a Christian perspective. His work regularly appears on BreakPoint online and SALVO magazine among other places. Regis also teaches and speaks on a variety of worldview topics, covering everything from Sharing the Gospel in a Postmodern Generation to String Theory. He currently serves as lay pastor of Hamilton Anglican Fellowship (www.hamiltonaf.org) in Chattanooga, Tennessee.
  • 2007 Aug 10
  • Comments

For many years evolutionary scientists thought that humans (homo sapiens) were direct descendants of the Neanderthal. Then it was discovered that humans and their sub-human ancestors were co-existent--meaning that both came from an earlier, common ancestor, homo erectus which, itself, was thought to descend from homo habilis.

Now research by Meave Leakey (of the famous paleontology clan) indicates that homo erectus and homo habilis were also co-existent. That leaves the identity of our primordial ancestor unknown while pushing back his arrival by about half a million years.

But as the goalposts of evolution keep moving back, don’t expect evolutionary scientists to “find” that all of these examples were coterminous (giving credence to the theistic narrative). No siree, if you follow what Leakey’s co-researcher, Susan Anton, had to say: "This is not questioning the idea at all of evolution; it is refining some of the specific points."

Ms. Anton goes on to explain: "This is a great example of what science does and religion doesn't do. It's a continuous self-testing process." (Except, you can be sure, “questioning the idea at all of evolution.”) 

What are your thoughts about this recent find? Post them here.